Ham Antennas!


Information on some of my RETIRED ANTENNA related projects

-To return to the "Main Antenna" section, click on the "Antennas" link.


In this section of my web page, you will find images and some limited data on both MOBILE and FIXED ham antenna installations and/or projects.



HF Mobile Antenna Mounts

-For more info and pictures on the MOBILE ANTENNA MOUNTS, click on the "Mobile Antenna mount fabrication" here.



HF Base Station antenna installations

Various types of base-station HF antenna will be shown here. Two are one wavelength (1WL) 160 Meter horizontally polarized LOOP antennas. Another antenna is a75/40 meter INVERTED VEE dipole. Then, there is my 2 WL (two wave-length) 160 meter antenna project; This antenna will be shown first.

Two wave-length 160-Meter Loop Antenna

Be aware that the first two pictures below are 180 degree PANORAMIC images. As such, they can be disorienting to follow. (Click on the images; -This will open the picture up in a larger size. Your cursor will have either a PLUS (+) or a MINUS (-) in place of the normal appearance. Click on the + or - to zoom in or out. While the images are deployed in full size, you can use your normal SCROLLING ACTIONS to move around the image.) (When you are finished looking at the linked image, just use your web browser's BACK button to return back here.) I will add two panoramic images of this huge antenna as follows:

Above: Looking NORTH-EAST

Above: Looking SOUTH-SOUTH-EAST

Note: Click on either of the two images above; This will open into a very large display, which you can click on to expand, then SCROLL LEFT AND RIGHT, to get a better view. (When you are finished looking at the linked image, just use your web browser's BACK button to return back here.)

The next two pictures show the 38 foot mast construction. The base is a 4x4 treated wood pole that is 20 feet long; It is planted into the ground 4 feet deep. The mast metal portion is a series of three EMT pipes, telescoped by one foot, and bolted in place. I also installed two GIN POLE assemblies to keep the mast from bending under load. The metal is VERY sturdy, but the WOOD was a lot more flexible than I had expected. As a result, I used 2 inch EMT tubing that is 13 feet long, as a result of welding an extension to the stock ten foot length. I placed the bottom end of the BRACE on a piece of wood that is pinned in place, so that it will not slide. This arrangement allows me to reposition the brace as needed.



The loop is a 2WL loop referenced to the 160 meter ham band. The top wire is the active element, and is 1015 feet long. The active element is made from #14 THHN stranded wire. The lower wire is a "reflector" that is 1063 feet long, and is at the 18 foot level. This wire was added as an experiment to possibly improve the NVIS performance on 75 meters, and it has made a 15 dB improvement over the past performance.

Loop layout

The image above shows how the new loop is positioned some 200 feet North of the house. It is in an open field, and is about 100' from ant trees, etc. The new loop is VERY quiet, compared to any the the other antennas, mostly due to the fact that the antenna is away from the house.

-To return to the "Main Antenna" section, click on the "Antennas" link.

-For more info and pictures on the MAST CONSTRUCTION, click on the "Mast construction fabrication" link.

-For information on a USB-controlled "antenna switching" relay box, click on the "Relay box pictures" link.



NORTH 160-Meter Loop Antenna

Loop antenna

Above: This is my NORTH 160-Meter loop antenna. It is about 50 feet high, and is fed with about 60 feet of 450 Ohm ladder-line. The ladder line is fed by a 4:1 current balun, which is mounted inside the garage. The garage is near the base of the 53 foot Rohn HDB-style tower.

Loop antenna

Above: This is the feed point of the NORTH 160-Meter loop antenna The ladder line is held away from the tower by PVC pipe, with "T" fittings to allow for any needed movement. The center insulator is made from a piece of plexiglass, which is made so that it will provide the needed strain relief for the ladder line. (Also shown is my "reference" antenna, which is a simple 80/40 Meter dipole, at the 30 foot point on the tower. It is fed with RG-8 coax.)



SOUTH 160-Meter Loop Antenna

Loop antenna

Above: This is my SOUTH 160-Meter loop antenna. It averages about 35 feet high, and is fed with about 80 feet of 450 Ohm ladder-line. The ladder line is attached to a 4:1 balun at the West end of the house's roof. A 30 foot run of RG-8 coax runs into the basement shop, to an antenna switch and HF radio.


Loop antenna

Above: This is the feed point of the SOUTH 160-Meter loop antenna. The center insulator is store-bought and will provide the needed strain relief for the ladder line.

-To return to the "Main Antenna" section, click on the "Antennas" link.