Mobile Antennas!

HF Mobile antenna installations

Two types of roof-mounted HF antenna will be shown here first. One is a fixed antenna mount. The second antenna mount is the second-generation mount, which employs a home-made "tilting mechanism."



HF Mobile Antenna #1

(Fixed antenna mount)

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Fixed antenna base

Above: The freshly fabricated HF antenna base. Material is stainless steel.

Mounted antenna base

Above: The nearly mounted HF antenna base. The antenna will be mounted at the left-rear of the roof of my Chrysler minivan.

Fixed antenna base

Above: The freshly mounted HF antenna base. A hole is drilled in the roof of the mini-van, to allow the feedline to enter the car.

Fixed antenna base

Above: The antenna base, as viewed from the front of the vehicle.

Fixed antenna base

Above: As viewed from the right side of the vehicle. (Note the position of the feedline, as it drops through a small hole in the roof. The feedline is made from a scrap of RG-8 coax.)

Fixed antenna base

Above: This is the mounting plate for the antenna tuner. The tuner will be mounted inside the vehicle. The mounting position is derived as a result of a removal of a factory-installed A/C and light assembly. Note that I have picked up three good grounds for the tuner.

Fixed antenna base

Above: The antenna tuner is hung in place, as the installation progresses.

Fixed antenna base

Above: The Icom AH-4 auto-antenna tuner is in place. Note the antenna fedline; This is the center wire from RG-8 coaxial cable, with the shield removed. It is about ten inches long, and passes through a small hole in the roof, and is terminated at the base of the Hustler antenna ball-mount.

Fixed antenna base

Above: The radio "stack." Top radio is an Icom IC-706 MKIIg. The lower radio is an Icom IC-7620 VHF-UHF FM tranceiver. (Both radios are remoted; The radios are in the rear of the van.

Fixed antenna base

Above: A rear view of the newly installed HF antenna. Note: The previous installation employed the tow-hitch mounted spring/ball mount. The roof location has been extremely satisfactory!! In all of my HF-mobile days, I have NEVER had the GREAT response to my as-expected mobile signals, as I am experiencing now. (It works WELL, to say the least!)

(Click on any of the small images to see the full size picture...)


-To return to the ANTENNAS page, click on "ANTENNAS" here.

HF Mobile Antenna #2

(Tilting antenna mount)

Tilting antenna base

Above: The assembled base plate is being positioned on the left-rear of the Chrysler mini-van's roof.

Tilting antenna base

Above: More figgerin'..... The active device is a LINEAR ACTUATOR. It runs on 12 volts DC, and has a rating of 110 pounds of thrust. The "throw" is eight inches. The linear actuator has built-in limit switches, so all I have to do is provide the DC voltage of either polarity, and the unit will run to the built-in limit. (I use a center-off switch, so I can stop it in any position, if I so desire.)

Tilting antenna base

Above: The assembled base plate's positioning is close to a final decision.

Tilting antenna base

Above: The assembled base plate has been mounted in place on the mini-van's roof.

Tilting antenna base

Above: The first time the full system has been tried. (Now at the 45 degree point.)

Tilting antenna base

Above: The first time the full system has been tried. (Now at the fully DOWN position.)

Tilting antenna base

Above: A side-view of the power-antenna mount.

Tilting antenna base

Above: A rear-view of the power-antenna mount.

Tilting antenna base

Above: A side-view of the power-antenna mount, as viewed from the right side of the mini-van.

Tilting antenna base

Above: A side-view of the antenna mount about half way up.

Tilting antenna base

Above: A side-view of the antenna mount fully up.

Tilting antenna base

Above: A side-view of the antenna mount fully way up, as viewed from the right side of the vehicle.

Tilting antenna base

Above: A side-view of the antenna mount fully way up. (Note that the base-plate is offset on the right side, so it will remain parallel to the ground.)

Tilting antenna base

Above: A view of the antenna mount, showing the placement of the DC power wires. (A second small hole had to be made in the roof of the vehicle for the two heavy power wires. I also added a quick-disconnect in the DC power lines.)

Tilting antenna base

Above: One last view of the antenna mount. The device has proven to work well. FYI: It takes more than twenty seconds to run up or down.

(Click on any of the small images to see the full size picture...)

-To return to the ANTENNAS page, click on "ANTENNAS" here. }